Survivors' identification of protective factors and early warning signs for intimate partner violence

An exploratory, qualitative study generated hypotheses about women in violent heterosexual relationships: reasons women stay, what helps end the violence, barriers, potential early warning signs, resources, racial differences, and location differences. Twenty-two focus groups of urban and rural African American and White women in five U.S. regions were convened. Participants were at least 18 years of age, had experienced physical violence in intimate relationships, and had been free of violence for at least 6 months. Findings provide insights and tangible suggestions for social institutions to help victims. The findings suggest a need for health communications messages and interventions to help others vulnerable to abuse
Author: 
Short,Lynn M.
McMahon,Pamela M.
Chervin,Doryn Davis
Shelley,Gene A.
Lezin,Nicole
Sloop,Kira Sue
Dawkins,Nicola
Notes: 
AN- 3018194 Full Text: Unavailable
Reprint Status: 
IN FILE
Start Page: 
272
End Page: 
285
Journal/Periodical Name: 
Violence Against Women
Volume: 
6
Issue: 
3
Abstract: 
This study proposed hypotheses concerning factors that may place women at risk for an abusive relationship, the potential early warning signs for physical partner violence, and the potential protective factors for cessation of violence once it has begun. Questions addressed women in violent sexual relationships: reasons women remain in abusive relationships, factors that may end the violence, barriers, potential early warning signs, resources, racial differences, and location differences. Urban and rural African American and White women (N = 168) in five US regions were recruited for 22 focus groups. Participants were between the ages of 18-50 years old, had been exposed to physical violence in intimate relationships, and were free of violence for at least 6 months at the time of the study. Similarities were found among all groups in their experiences of intimate partner violence. Furthermore, women in the focus groups stated that once violence began within their relationships, it escalated over time. The authors suggest implications for intervention. For example, the information gleaned from the participants may be informative to institutions that are active in removing women from violent relationships. Particularly, three areas of prevention implications were discussed. These include: the need for awareness in identifying early warning signs of intimate partner violence, the significance of family abuse history, and the need to educate adolescents
Topic Areas: 
Male-female relations; prevention; racial/ethnic differences; risk; survivors
Reference Type: 
JOUR
Reference ID: 
366
Publication Date: 
2000