Stepping on toes: Social roots of date rape lead to intractability and politicization

Argues, using both qualitative and quantitative findings, that abundant rape-supportive environments encourage sexually aggressive men to act on their impulses and discourage women from reporting experiences in which they feel they were victimized. To support this perspective, the authors examine the ease with which coercive beliefs and aggressive behaviors fit within our cultural understanding of sexuality, and discuss the social context in which the potentially sexually aggressive man lives, considering the mediating role played by peer-group support. The effects on women of being nested within these contexts is considered, paying special attention to scripted notions of women"s sexual roles and stereotypes of "deserving victims."" /// After discussing the influences on, and behaviors of, both sexes, the authors conclude with a discussion of the dyadic aspects of sexual coercion, examining the role that each sex plays in determining the immediate environment of the other. They argue that it is this behavioral interdependence that leads to the intractability of date rape among college students. The authors also attempt to demonstrate both the reasons why this area of research has become politicized and the meaning that can be drawn from this politicization. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2002 APA, all rights reserved)
Author: 
Koss,Mary P.
Cleveland,Hobart H.
Notes: 
IB- 0-8039-7369-1, hardcover IB- 0-8039-7370-5, paperback LA- English AN- 1997-08362-001
Reprint Status: 
IN FILE
Start Page: 
4
End Page: 
21
Volume: 
First
Issue: 
1
Abstract: 
This article discusses approaches to understanding rape and sexual aggression. The authors contend that rape-supportive environments encourage sexually aggressive men to act on their impulses and discourage women from identifying and reporting experiences of victimization. Coercive beliefs and aggressive behaviors are examined as part of our cultural understanding of sexuality. The authors address why this area of research is politicized and what this politicization means.
Topic Areas: 
Male-female relations; risk; perpetration; vulnerability
Reference Type: 
CHAP
Reference ID: 
206
Publication Date: 
1997