Overcoming men's defensiveness toward sexual assault programs: Learning to help survivors

Author: 
Foubert,John D.
Marriott,Kenneth A.
Notes: 
no PDF, just hard copy
Reprint Status: 
IN FILE
Start Page: 
470
End Page: 
472
Journal/Periodical Name: 
Journal of College Student Development
Volume: 
37
Issue: 
4
Abstract: 
The authors state that men's defensiveness toward talking about rape functions to protect them from feeling guilty about the violent behavior of other men. The authors then describe a program designed to help men to overcome defensive reactions by identifying supportive roles for them that may help them to decrease both the prevalence and damaging effects of rape. The How to Help a Sexual Assault Survivor program consists of peer educators who encourage men to help survivors by listening to them, believing what they say happened, and accepting the survivor's decisions. Additionally, men are urged to resist the temptation to ask the survivor for details about the rape and to avoid suggestions of further violence. The initial results of the program appear to be positive. In a pilot survey of 17 male college students, 65% reported that they were less likely to be sexually coercive after having seen the program.
Topic Areas: 
male-female relations; prevention
Reference Type: 
JOUR
Reference ID: 
2463
Publication Date: 
1996