A mixed-gender date rape prevention intervention targeting freshmen college athletes.

This paper describes the evaluation of a mixed-gender workshop given to all freshman athletes from a large eastern university. A randomized post-test only experimental design was used to compare the date rape attitudes of freshman athletes who were exposed to a mixed-gender date rape workshop (n=56) with those of athletes who were not exposed (n=85). A previously validated instrument, the 25 item Date Rape Attitudes Survey (DRAS) was used as the criterion measure. Three hypotheses were tested with the following results: (1) men athletes reported attitudes that were more tolerant of date rape than those reported by women athletes (i.e., the men were more likely to condone date rape), (2) freshmen athletes in the control group reported attitudes that were more tolerant of date rape than those reported by athletes in the treatment group. The third hypothesis which was tested but not supported was that men athletes did not exhibit a greater program effect than women athletes. Finally, the authors discuss implications of the study and offer recommendations for future date rape prevention programs.
Author: 
Holcomb,Derek R.
Savage,Michael P.
Seehafer,Roger W
Reprint Status: 
IN FILE
Start Page: 
165
End Page: 
179
Journal/Periodical Name: 
College Student Journal
Volume: 
36
Issue: 
2
Abstract: 
Research on sexual assault has shown that college women are a high-risk group for victimization. Furthermore, studies have shown that a high percentage of college men admit to engaging in sexually coercive behavior. Researchers have suggested a relationship between rape tolerant attitudes and behavior and sexual assault perpetration. In this study, 141 freshmen college athletes at a large Mideastern university were separated into two groups in order to compare the effectiveness of a mixed-gender date rape prevention program. The Date Rape Attitudes Survey (DRAS) (Holcomb, Sondag, Holcomb, 1993) was used to compare the treatment group's posttest responses to the posttest responses of the control group (which received no mixed-gender date rape prevention training). Analysis of the results showed that attitudes more tolerant of date rape were more prevalent in the control group than in the treatment group. Also, male athletes were more likely to condone date rape than female athletes were. The impact of the mixed-gender date rape prevention program was not significantly different across gender.
Topic Areas: 
Athletes/Fraternities, Male-Female Relations, Prevention
Reference Type: 
JOUR
Reference ID: 
1583
Publication Date: 
2002/June