The longitudinal effects of a rape-prevention program on fraternity men's attitudes, behavioral intent, and behavior.

Rape myth acceptance, likelihood of raping, and sexually coercive behavior of 145 fraternity men randomly assigned to a control group or a rape-prevention program were surveyed. One third of 23 fraternities on a mid-Atlantic public university campus volunteered to participate in the study. The rape-prevention intervention consisted of "the men's program," a victim empathy-based presentation titled "How to help a sexual assault survivor: What men can do." Although no evidence of change in sexually coercive behavior was found, significant 7-month declines in rape myth acceptance and the likelihood of committing rape were shown among program participants. In the case of rape myth acceptance, the 7-month decrement remained lower in the participant group than in the control group. Implications of using these initial findings from the men's program for rape-prevention programming are discussed
Author: 
Foubert,John D.
Notes: 
IL- 2 charts AN- 2747105 Full Text: Available
Reprint Status: 
IN FILE
Start Page: 
158
End Page: 
163
Journal/Periodical Name: 
Journal of American College Health
Volume: 
48
Issue: 
4
Abstract: 
This study presents the results of 145 fraternity men from a mid-Atlantic university who were randomly selected to determine the results of a victim empathy-based rape prevention program presented by all-male sexual assault prevention peer educators. No evidence of change in sexually coercive behavior was found. Significant declines in rape myth acceptance and the likelihood of committing rape were found with program participants immediately following the intervention. At the 7-month follow-up the decrease in rape myth acceptance remained lower among program participants than within the control group.
Topic Areas: 
Athletes/Fraternities, Myths/Stereotypes, Prevention
Reference Type: 
JOUR
Reference ID: 
118
Publication Date: 
2000