programs

An all-male rape prevention peer education program: Decreasing fraternity men's behavioral intent to rape

Participants were college fraternity men (N=155) who were in either a pretested and posttested rape-prevention program, a posttested rape-prevention program, or an untreated control group. Significant declines in rape myth acceptance and behavioral intent to rape were shown among program participants regardless of whether they were pretested. (Author/MKA)

The effectiveness of personalizing acquaintance rape prevention: Programs on perception of vulnerability and on reducing risk-taking behavior

Tested hypothesis that a personalized acquaintance rape prevention program reduces risk-taking behavior and increases perception of vulnerability. Seventy female college students were exposed to Acquaintance Rape Prevention Program with experimentals and controls receiving personalized or nonpersonalized instruction, respectively. Findings showed personalizing the acquaintance rape prevention program increased intent to avoid risk-taking behaviors for all women. (Author/PVV)

The evaluation of a sexual assault self-defense and risk-reduction program for college women: A prospective study

The present study evaluated the efficacy of a sexual assault risk-reduction program that included a physical self-defense component for college women (N= 500). Program group women significantly increased their protective behaviors over the 6-month follow-up period compared to the waiting-list control group. However, there were no significant differences between the two groups regarding rates of sexual victimization, assertive communication, or feelings of self-efficacy over the follow-up periods.

Empowering programs with evaluation technical assistance: Outcomes and lessons learned

Although empowerment evaluation has gained widespread currency, few reports have described its outcomes. This article combines perspectives of participants and technical assistance providers to describe the process and outcomes of the Evaluation Assistance for Sexual Violence Programs project. Participating programs reported substantial enhancements in evaluation capacity, resources devoted to evaluation, and the extent and sophistication of their evaluation practice, as well as numerous examples of the application of evaluation findings to program improvement.

Evaluation of a coeducational interactive rape prevention program

Illustrates one way in which counselors can contribute to rape victim services on campus besides providing direct remedial services. Presentation of the program to members of sororities and fraternities; Endorsement of fewer rape-supportive attitudes by participants; Recommendations for counselors interested in developing and evaluating similar programs

The longitudinal effects of a rape-prevention program on fraternity men's attitudes, behavioral intent, and behavior.

Rape myth acceptance, likelihood of raping, and sexually coercive behavior of 145 fraternity men randomly assigned to a control group or a rape-prevention program were surveyed. One third of 23 fraternities on a mid-Atlantic public university campus volunteered to participate in the study.

Justifying conclusions in naturalistic evaluations: A practical perspective

Naturalistic approaches to program evaluation generate multiple interpretations and possible conclusions, but lack inherent guidance on how to choose among or reconcile them. A practical frame of reference for addressing this challenge emphasizes criteria of utility and credibility, as well as an evaluation process that is participatory and openly value-pluralistic. This paper discusses the logic of justification underlying such a practical perspective.

College women's experiences with physically forced, alcohol- or other drug-enabled, and drug-facilitated sexual assault before and since entering college

OBJECTIVE: Research has shown associations between college women's alcohol and/or drug consumption and the risk of sexual assault, but few studies have measured the various means by which sexual assault is achieved. PARTICIPANTS: The authors' Campus Sexual Assault Study obtained self-report data from a random sample of undergraduate women (N = 5,446). METHODS: The authors collected data on sexual assault victimization by using a cross-sectional, Web-based survey, and they conducted analyses assessing the role of substance use.

College women's experiences with physically forced, alcohol- or other drug-enabled, and drug-facilitated sexual assault before and since entering college

OBJECTIVE: Research has shown associations between college women's alcohol and/or drug consumption and the risk of sexual assault, but few studies have measured the various means by which sexual assault is achieved. PARTICIPANTS: The authors' Campus Sexual Assault Study obtained self-report data from a random sample of undergraduate women (N = 5,446). METHODS: The authors collected data on sexual assault victimization by using a cross-sectional, Web-based survey, and they conducted analyses assessing the role of substance use.

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