prevention

College women's experiences with physically forced, alcohol- or other drug-enabled, and drug-facilitated sexual assault before and since entering college

OBJECTIVE: Research has shown associations between college women's alcohol and/or drug consumption and the risk of sexual assault, but few studies have measured the various means by which sexual assault is achieved. PARTICIPANTS: The authors' Campus Sexual Assault Study obtained self-report data from a random sample of undergraduate women (N = 5,446). METHODS: The authors collected data on sexual assault victimization by using a cross-sectional, Web-based survey, and they conducted analyses assessing the role of substance use.

College women's experiences with physically forced, alcohol- or other drug-enabled, and drug-facilitated sexual assault before and since entering college

OBJECTIVE: Research has shown associations between college women's alcohol and/or drug consumption and the risk of sexual assault, but few studies have measured the various means by which sexual assault is achieved. PARTICIPANTS: The authors' Campus Sexual Assault Study obtained self-report data from a random sample of undergraduate women (N = 5,446). METHODS: The authors collected data on sexual assault victimization by using a cross-sectional, Web-based survey, and they conducted analyses assessing the role of substance use.

The global health burden of rape

Focuses on research on the physiological effect of rape on women. Rape myths; Health consequences of rape; Normative and non-normative rape; Ethnographic studies on rape. The focus of this paper is the health burden of rape, which is addressed from the global perspective and includes discussion of its prevalence and psychological, sociocultural, somatic, andPersonal reproductive health consequences. Quantitative efforts to capture the relative economic impact of rape compared to other threats to women's health are also discussed.

Stepping on toes: Social roots of date rape lead to intractability and politicization

Argues, using both qualitative and quantitative findings, that abundant rape-supportive environments encourage sexually aggressive men to act on their impulses and discourage women from reporting experiences in which they feel they were victimized. To support this perspective, the authors examine the ease with which coercive beliefs and aggressive behaviors fit within our cultural understanding of sexuality, and discuss the social context in which the potentially sexually aggressive man lives, considering the mediating role played by peer-group support.

College women's experiences with physically forced, alcohol- or other drug-enabled, and drug-facilitated sexual assault before and since entering college

OBJECTIVE: Research has shown associations between college women's alcohol and/or drug consumption and the risk of sexual assault, but few studies have measured the various means by which sexual assault is achieved. PARTICIPANTS: The authors' Campus Sexual Assault Study obtained self-report data from a random sample of undergraduate women (N = 5,446). METHODS: The authors collected data on sexual assault victimization by using a cross-sectional, Web-based survey, and they conducted analyses assessing the role of substance use.

Street careers: Homelessness, drug use, and sex work among young men who have sex with men (YMSM)

"Hustling" or sex work is a common means of surviving on the streets and paying for drugs among homeless youth. In this article, we formulate the concepts of "street capital" and "street competencies" to describe how 10 young men who have sex with men (YMSM) in New York City accumulated various knowledge and skills throughout their childhood and adolescence, and later entered into homelessness and the street economy as sex workers. While half of these young men described themselves as gay or bisexual, sexual identity was not a primary consideration amongst these youth.

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