The influence of gender role stereotyping on women's experiences of female same-sex intimate partner violence

Female same-sex intimate partner violence (FSSIPV) is a serious problem that affects the health and safety of lesbian and bisexual women. To begin to address the paucity of research, a mixed methods study was conducted to identify shared and unique risk and protective factors for FSSIPV. This article reports on qualitative findings related to the influence of gender role stereotyping on women's experiences of FSSIPV. Findings indicate that gender role stereotyping shapes women's experiences of FSSIPV by influencing individual, familial, community, and societal perceptions and responses to this phenomenon
Author: 
Hassouneh,D.
Glass,N.
Notes: 
DA
Reprint Status: 
NOT IN FILE
Start Page: 
310
End Page: 
325
Journal/Periodical Name: 
Violence Against Women
Volume: 
14
Issue: 
3
Abstract: 
This article reported the qualitative findings of a study that examined risk factors for female same-sex intimate partner violence (FSSIPV) within individual, familial, community, and societal contexts. Fifty-two women between the ages of 15 and 64 participated in individual or group interviews. Four themes emerged from the study. Three themes, girls don't hit girls, myth of lesbian utopia, and the belief that two women cannot really hurt one another, indicated that there may be a lack of awareness of FSSIPV, denial, and minimization of women's use of violence. The theme, playing the feminine victim, suggests that there needs to be specific education and training about FSSIPV for those who work in criminal justice system.
Topic Areas: 
lesbian, gay, bisexual transgender, myths/stereotypes
Reference Type: 
JOUR
Reference ID: 
2569
Publication Date: 
2008/03