Incapacitated rape and alcohol use: a prospective analysis

This study examined timing of alcohol-related sexual assaults (incapacitated rape) in relation to both alcohol consumption and alcohol-related negative consequences. The sample was drawn from a randomly selected pool of college students across three campuses (n=1238) followed over a three year time period. 91% of students never experienced an incapacitated rape, 2% reported an incapacitated rape prior to the first assessment point (n=30), and 6% reported one over the course of the study (n=76). Results indicated that incapacitated rape was associated with higher alcohol use and more negative consequences in the years prior to the assault. Incapacitated rape was also associated with higher alcohol use and more negative consequences during the year in which the rape took place and subsequent years, with highest rates measured for the year of the rape. These results suggest alcohol use can function as both risk factor and consequence of sexual victimization
Author: 
Kaysen,D.
Neighbors,C.
Martell,J.
Fossos,N.
Larimer,M.E.
Notes: 
DA
Reprint Status: 
IN FILE
Start Page: 
1820
End Page: 
1832
Journal/Periodical Name: 
Addictive Behaviors
Volume: 
31
Issue: 
10
Abstract: 
Male and female students at three colleges completed questionnaires about alcohol use at three time points over three years. Incapacitated rape was assessed with the question, have you ever been pressured or forced to have sex with someone because you were too drunk to prevent it? More women than men reported ever having experienced incapacitated sexual assault (10.0% vs. 5.7%). Students who drank the most and had the most self-reported alcohol-related problems were more likely to experience incapacitated sexual assault. The relationship was cyclical: after sexual assault, students drank more and had more alcohol-related problems. Women who had never experienced incapacitated rape and who were not raped during the study period drank less than other students. Results from the study indicated that programs to discourage high-risk drinking among college students may help reduce incidence of sexual assault. The researchers suggested that early intervention following sexual assault may help prevent later increases in alcohol use and alcohol-related problems.
Topic Areas: 
Alcohol; college
Reference Type: 
JOUR
Reference ID: 
2423
Publication Date: 
2006/10