Examining immediate and long-term efficacy of rape prevention programming with racially diverse college men

Investigates the short- and long-term effectiveness of a theoretically driven, programmatic rape prevention intervention on a sample of primarily White and Black college men. Importance of longer term interventions; Relevance of the culturally specific intervention to racial and ethnic minorities; Decrease in rape supportive attitudes
Author: 
Heppner,Mary J.
Neville,Helen A.
Smith,Kendra
Kivlighan,Dennis M
Gershuny,Beth S.
Notes: 
IL- 2 charts, 1 diagram AN- 1556616 Full Text: Unavailable
Reprint Status: 
IN FILE
Start Page: 
16
End Page: 
26
Journal/Periodical Name: 
Journal of Counseling Psychology
Volume: 
46
Issue: 
1
Abstract: 
The authors investigated the short- and long-term (5-month) effectiveness of a theoretically driven, programmatic rape prevention intervention on a sample of primarily White and Black college men. A racially diverse sample was included, and the potential effectiveness of both a culturally relevant and a traditional colorblind intervention was assessed. In contrast to earlier investigations, which have consistently reported an overall rebound of scores at the follow-up assessment, results from a hierarchical cluster analysis indicated three patterns of treatment response: improving, deteriorating, and rebounding. Results also indicated that Black students in the culturally relevant treatment condition were more cognitively engaged in the intervention than their peers in the traditional treatment condition.
Topic Areas: 
Prevention; racial/ethnic differences
Reference Type: 
JOUR
Reference ID: 
163
Publication Date: 
1999/01