An examination of sexual violence against college women

This investigation examined college women's experiences with unwanted sexual contact. Participants completed a questionnaire assessing the incidence of various types of forced sexual contact the women had experienced since enrolling in college. Demographic and situational variables associated with these incidents of sexual violence were also obtained. It was observed that since enrolling in college, 27% of the sample had experienced unwanted sexual contact ranging from kissing and petting to oral, anal, or vaginal intercourse. Type of sexual violence, perpetrator characteristics, and racial differences regarding types of unwanted sexual contact were examined. The implications of the data are discussed
Author: 
Gross,Alan M.
Winslett,Andrea
Roberts,Miguel
Gohm,Carol L.
Reprint Status: 
IN FILE
Start Page: 
288
End Page: 
300
Journal/Periodical Name: 
Violence Against Women
Volume: 
12
Issue: 
3
Abstract: 
The purpose of the study was to examine the incidence and correlates of different forms of sexual victimization among a sample of college women. The sample consisted of 935 undergraduate female students who were recruited from introductory psychology classes and on-campus sororities. A questionnaire was administered to participants in small groups. The results showed that 27% of the women had experienced unwanted sexual contact since enrolling in college. Thirty-seven percent of the sample reported multiple forced sexual experiences. African-American women reported higher rates of sexual victimization compared to White women. Survivors and perpetrators reported high rates of alcohol consumption during the time of the sexual experience. Boyfriends were the most common perpetrator of sexual aggression. Implications for prevention efforts are discussed.
Topic Areas: 
College, Prevalence, Risk
Reference Type: 
JOUR
Reference ID: 
2267
Publication Date: 
2006/03/01