An evaluation of safe dates, an adolescent dating violence prevention program

Assessed the effects of the Safe Dates program on the primary and secondary prevention of adolescent dating violence. 14 public schools in a predominantly rural county were randomly assigned to either a treatment or control condition. 1,886 Ss (aged 11-17 yrs) completed baseline questionnaires and 1,700 completed follow-up questionnaires. Ss in the treatment group were exposed to Safe Dates school and community activities: control Ss were exposed to community activities only. Treatment and control groups were comparable at baseline. At follow-up, less psychological abuse, sexual violence, and violence perpetrated against the current dating partner were reported in treatment than in control schools. In a subsample of Ss reporting no dating violence at baseline (primary prevention subsample), there was less initiation of psychological abuse in treatment than in control schools. In a subsample of Ss reporting dating violence at baseline (secondary prevention subsample), there was less psychological abuse and sexual violence perpetration reported at follow-up in treatment than in control schools. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2002 APA, all rights reserved)
Author: 
Foshee,Vangie
Bauman,Karl E.
Arriaga,Ximena B.
Helms,Russell W.
Koch,Gary G.
Linder,George Fletcher
Notes: 
LA- English AN- 1998-00867-004
Reprint Status: 
IN FILE
Start Page: 
45
End Page: 
50
Journal/Periodical Name: 
American Journal of Public Health
Volume: 
88
Issue: 
1
Abstract: 
Fourteen public schools in a rural county were randomly assigned to treatment or control conditions. Of the students involved, 1,886 subjects completed pretest and 1,700 subjects completed posttest measures. Members of the treatment group took part in the Safe Dates school curriculum and community activities. Those in the control schools were only presented with community activities. At the time of the posttest, those in the treatment schools reported less psychological abuse, less sexual violence, and less violence perpetrated against the current dating partner than those in control schools. Those reporting no dating violence at Time 1 indicated there was less initiation of abuse in treatment than in control schools at Time 2. Those reporting dating violence at Time 1 indicated there was less psychological abuse and sexual violence perpetration occurring in treatment schools post intervention. The problems associated with collecting posttest data directly after an intervention are discussed. The authors indicate that they are in the process of collecting data for a 1-year follow-up to address these limitations.
Topic Areas: 
Adolescent/High School, Curriculum, Evaluation
Reference Type: 
JOUR
Reference ID: 
117
Publication Date: 
1998