Antiviolence education in high schools

Focuses on the implementation and evaluation of antiviolence education programs in high schools. Changes in the attitudes toward violence against women; Use of antiviolence education to improve knowledge about dating violence; Experience of aggression
Author: 
Hilton,N.Zoe
Harris,Grant T.
Rice,Marnie E.
Smith Krans,Tina
Lavigne,Sandra E.
Notes: 
IL- 1 chart AN- 1290793 Full Text: Unavailable
Reprint Status: 
IN FILE
Start Page: 
726
End Page: 
742
Journal/Periodical Name: 
Journal of Interpersonal Violence
Volume: 
13
Issue: 
6
Abstract: 
This study examined the effects of a knowledge-based intervention administered to 350 eleventh grade students. Variables addressed included a measure of knowledge retained from the intervention, a measure of date rape attitudes, and a measure of self-reported physical and sexual aggression perpetrated by peers. Students chose to attend two 1-hour workshops from six available workshops. Analysis of their responses revealed results that may contribute toward improvements in future school-based prevention education programs. For example, classroom workshops were able to convey the most information. However, attrition of membership at the workshops, especially by students who scored low during the pretest, may account for the higher scores during the posttest phase. As such, the authors suggest that antiviolence education in high schools ought to involve training students to recognize warning signs of violence, provide them with guidance for terminating violent relationships, and aim to improve the selection of high-risk students for treatment.
Topic Areas: 
Adolescent/High School, Curriculum, Evaluation, Risk
Reference Type: 
JOUR
Reference ID: 
267
Publication Date: 
1998